Donate to TechAdvance

Your TechAdvance donation helps Rutgers researchers bring valuable innovations to market so they can make a positive impact on the world around us!

To Donate

  • Click the Donate button

  • Use the searchbar to search for "TechAdvance"

  • Select Rutgers TechAdvance – Science and Technology Commercialization Fund.

Funded Projects

 

TechAdvance®

Improved Cardiovascular Evaluation (ICE)

Rutgers Inventor(s): Andrew J Gow; Gillian M Cannon
Awarded: May 2019

Summary:

Currently we assess cardiovascular health using simple indirect measures such as blood pressure.  At the population level these measures are useful in determining risk of disease, but they do not assess directly an individual’s functionality.  Much more complicated and invasive techniques, such as cardiac catheterization, are available, however, they are expensive and not without risk.  At the personal level, what we are concerned with is “how well does the cardiovascular system supply blood to the body”.  The supply of blood to working tissue is critical both to our health and our physical performance. We have developed a simple algorithm that can be used with present wearable technology to assess how well we supply blood.  This algorithm can be used to direct both diet and exercise regimens to improve health and performance.  It can give real time feedback as to how our lifestyle is affecting our health.

Market Applications:

  • Identification of individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease
  • Improved training and diet programs for athletes and weekend warriors alike
  • Assessment of the effectiveness of exercise programs in improving a person’s health
  • Real time performance assessment for coaches and trainers

(click to enlarge)

Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Immuno-Biologicals for Cancer and Viral Treatment

Rutgers Inventor(s): Sergei V. Kotenko; Raymond B. Birge; Viralkumar Davra
Awarded: April 2019

Summary:

Cancers and viruses suppress host immune responses by “masking themselves” with phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid that becomes exposed on the surface of apoptotic or stressed cells abundantly present in tumor microenvironment and in sites of virus infection. Rutgers scientists have developed multifunctional PS-targeting proteins that block PS-mediated immunosuppression and at the same time stimulate host immunity through the localized-delivery and combined action of type I and type III interferons (IFNs). These first-in-class proteins have demonstrated strong antiviral and anti-tumor potencies in mouse disease models.

Market Applications:

  • Cancer Therapeutics
  • Antiviral Therapeutics
  • Disease Prevention/Treatment

Download: PDF icon One Pager Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Immuno-Biologicals updated 2019.pdf

(click to enlarge)

Development of Biodegradable Nanoscaffolds for in vivo Drug Delivery and Stem Cell Differentiation

Rutgers Inventor(s): Ki-Bum Lee; Letao Yang
Awarded: February 2019

Summary:

Stem cell therapy that can secrete trophic factors and differentiate into specific functional cells holds great potential for treating diseases and tissue injuries. However, low survival rate and incomplete differentiation of stem cells in vivo remain a critical barrier for stem cell therapy before its full potential can be realized. To address the challenges above, the Rutgers team will develop biodegradable hybrid inorganic nanoscaffold-based stem cell therapies. This project will focus on comprehensive evaluation studies of the biocompatibility, degradation and therapeutic effects of this technology. Ultimately, the success of the current TechAdvance project will pave the road for a biodegradable hybrid nanoscaffold system towards FDA approval and provide a new treatment for patients suffering from incurable tissue injuries and diseases. 

Market Applications:

  • Stem cell therapy
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Central nervous system injuries/diseases
  • Drug delivery
  • Research tools
  • MRI imaging

(click to enlarge)

Machine Learning Algorithms to Improve Needle Localization in Procedures with Limited Visibility

Rutgers Inventor(s): Cosmas Mwikirize; John Nosher; Ilker Hacihaliloglu
Awarded: January 2019

Summary: 

Ultrasound is a popular imaging modality for guidance of minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies and regional anesthesia. However, needle visibility is often lost when advancing needles towards deep targets or complicated anatomy. This reduces procedure efficacy and could result in injury and post-procedure complications.  We have developed advanced machine learning algorithms that achieve real-time, automatic and robust localization of needles in procedures where needle visibility to the naked eye is limited. Rutgers TechAdvance award will be used to: 1) integrate the algorithms into a software platform compatible with existing cart-based and portable ultrasound systems, and 2) prepare the technology for clinical use through validation in clinical studies with physician testing in animal models.  

Market Applications:

  • Localization of needles in percutaneous ultrasound-guided interventional procedures such as regional anesthesia, peripheral vascular interventions, biopsies, fluid aspirations and fetal medicine.
  • Localization of other interventional devices such as guidewires and catheters under ultrasound guidance or other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy and endoscopy.

(click to enlarge)

Powered Toothbrush with Evacuation Technology

Rutgers Inventor(s): Maxine Strickland; Vivek Kumar
Awarded: January 2019

Summary:

When food is chewed or while drinking the tongue moves to push food or liquid toward the back of the throat, this process stimulates swallowing. The food or liquid swallowed then moves down the upper part of the throat, this back part is called the pharynx. After which, it goes into an area called the esophagus and then down into the stomach.  Management of fluids while brushing,in particular can be a challenge for the young or convalescent, the elderly, or disabled populations  who may ordinarily have difficulty spitting and may tend to swallow or aspirate toothpaste and particulates during the brushing process. When this happens the liquid or food can get into the wrong passage and instead it enters the lungs. This allows bacteria also to get into the lungs putting them at risk for aspiration pneumonia.

A Rutgers researcher had an idea and working in collaboration with a Biomedical Engineer at NJIT have put together a new powered toothbrush with evacuation technology for this reason. The Rutgers TechAdvance project will be used to prototype an esthetic model and design of its own. It is hoped that this innovation in toothbrushing can reduce problems with aspiration in this growing population and as well as put parents at ease while training young children in toothbrushing. The novel brush design can withdraw saliva, toothpaste and debris during brushing at a rate commensurate with activated saliva production as seen in the figure above.

Market Applications:

  • Evacuation assisted brushing

    • Elderly Populations

    •  Individuals with limited swallowing ability

    • Pediatric population

    •  Individuals in nursing homes

(click to enlarge)

Prediction of Lung cancer in High Risk Individuals

Rutgers Inventor(s): Emmanuel Zachariah
Awarded: December 2018

Summary: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Currently Computerized Tomography (CT) scans are being used to identify the malignant nodules in high-risk patients. However, CT scans yield a high rate of false-positive results. Consequently, many patients are subjected to anxiety and stress and recommended for unnecessary and costly biopsies or follow-up Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography (PET-CT) scans. Commercially available CT scan image analysis tools use volumetric based measurements, which are inadequate for making clinical decisions. This project aims to develop an integrated risk prediction model using a combination of gene expression and CT scan image data to better discriminate malignant nodules from benign nodules compared to the standalone CT scan method or genomic analysis. In the present study, we use gene expression signature pattern obtained from peripheral blood to discriminate the malignant nodules from benign nodules. In addition, we integrate the genomic data with CT scan image data to further increase the specificity of the present CT scan methods.

Market Applications:

  •  Early detection of lung cancer in asymptomatic high risk individuals

 

(click to enlarge)

Hydrogel Encapsulated Cells as Factories to Heal Wounds

Rutgers Inventor(s): Ronke Olabisi; Ayesha Aijaz
Awarded: December 2018

Summary:

Rutgers researchers have combined two different types of cells, which sends them into overdrive, pumping out wound-healing factors in greater amounts than when they are not combined. These combined cells are encapsulated into a hydrogel (think grapes in jello, but on the scale of the width of a few human hairs). The cells are then placed in a wound and the hydrogel protects them from the immune system, letting them secrete wound-healing factors and get nutrients from the wound fluid. The results show that wounds healed 3x faster and without scarring. This innovation could be used in burns and chronic wounds that the elderly, diabetic, obese and the mobility-impaired suffer from. The numbers of people with chronic wounds is increasing because all the aforementioned populations are increasing. There are some individuals who have had a chronic wound for 30 years. This invention could help these people, and healing without scar could potentially transform plastic and reconstructive surgery.

Market Applications:

  • Wound dressing for:
    • Burns
    • Radiation burns (95% of all cancer patients receiving radiation get radiation burns, and there is no clinical standard of care)
    • Surgery on healthy patients to reduce scarring
    • People who get hypertrophic scars or keloid, to reduce or eliminate their scarring

(click to enlarge)

Polyelectrolyte Complexes (PEC) Biomaterials - An in-Vivo Study

Rutgers Inventor(s): Noshir Langrana; Francois Berthaiume; Rene Schloss; Suneel Kumar
Awarded: December 2018

Summary: 

A significant complication occurring as a result of surgery or injury are fibrous scar-like bands between tissues and organs, called adhesions. These adhesions occur at impacted sites and can prevent the free movement of tissues and organs. Once bound, the adhesions can lead to loss-of-motion, pain, and possible organ damage. Current preventative solutions on the market consist of a degradable patch or sheet which can be placed on the surface of an implicated organ to isolated it from surrounding injured tissue. Rutgers researchers have developed a more advanced anti-inflammatory, flexible, and strong polymer material which can be grown into sheets and used to prevent the occurrence of adhesions after surgery. These sheets can be customized to incorporate additional therapeutic compounds such as antibiotics or pain relievers. This Rutgers TechAdvance project will be used to generate crucial histological and immunohistochemical data for validation of efficacy and for future planed regulatory approval.

 

(click to enlarge)

Sensitive, Multiplex PCR Assays that Assess the Abundance of Rare Somatic Mutations Associated with Cancer

Rutgers Inventor(s): Fred Kramer; Diana Vargas; Salvatore Marras; Sanjay Tyagi; Tova Gerber
Awarded: December 2018

Summary: SuperSelective PCR assays will be incorporated into clinical diagnostic assay kits that enable the determination of which somatic mutations are present in a person’s cancer, utilizing only a non-invasive blood sample, which information enables the choice of an effective targeted therapy.  These kits will also be used to frequently analyze blood samples from a patient, thereby assessing the progress of the therapy, and further enabling the patient’s therapy to be changed if resistance mutations arise in that patient’s cancer cells. Currently, the assessment of somatic mutations in a patient’s cancer requires either invasive tissue biopsies or very costly, time-consuming, less sensitive next-generation sequencing assays.  The availability of extremely sensitive, low-cost, rapid, multiplex SuperSelective PCR assays will lead to their adoption as the molecular diagnostic assay of choice for hospitals and clinical diagnostic laboratories, worldwide

 

(click to enlarge)

Discovery and Validation of Polymers Meeting Targeted Product Profile Specifications

Rutgers Inventor(s): Joachim Kohn
Awarded: December 2018

Summary:

Research at Rutgers University has resulted in several libraries of biodegradable polymers whose chemical, physical, and biological properties are customizable to specifications of industrial and academic collaborators. A brand-new collaboration with a leading chemical manufacturer will use these techniques to quickly identify lead polymer candidates and optimize them to match desired product specifications. Researchers at Rutgers University will use their expertise in polymer synthesis, characterization, and processing to work with a leading chemical manufacturer to make novel polymers available for commercial use. This work has the potential to impact thousands of lives through the introduction of new medical devices and treatments.

 

(click to enlarge)

Development of Enhanced Point-of-Care Assays for Detection of TB and NTM Infections

Rutgers Inventor(s): Abraham Pinter; Alok Choudhary
Awarded: October 2018

Summary:

Tuberculosis is currently the world’s leading cause of death due to infectious diseases. A major factor for this is that despite recent advances in TB diagnosis, a large percentage (~36%) of new infections go undetected. Dr. Pinter’s lab has isolated and characterized novel human monoclonal antibodies that possess increased sensitivity for the detection of a TB biomarker, lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the urine of infected patients, and have shown that this allows an improved low-cost point-of-care assay for the detection and identification of TB infections. They have also shown that by modifying the detection antibody, they can tailor this assay to detect other mycobactera, including Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTMs) that cause serious disease in a fraction of elderly patients or subpopulations who have immunodeficiencies (HIV patients, transplant recipients) or compromised lung function (Cystic Fibrosis patients, people with chronic Asthma COPD).  Unlike TB, which is found mostly in third-world countries, NTM infections are common-place all over the world. The goal of this project is to improve the sensitivity of these reagents and assays, in order to allow Point-of-Care assays for both TB and pathogenic NTM species.

(click to enlarge)

Smart Shoes for Biofeedback Sensing and Measurements of Motor Control Autonomy

Rutgers Inventor(s): Elizabeth Torres
Awarded: August 2018

Summary: 

Rutgers researchers have shown that you can use seemingly unrelated measurements, such as small changes in how you walk or how you sit, to diagnose neurological diseases such as Autism Spectrum Disorder or Parkinson’s Disease. The underpinning assumption is that we have interconnected central and peripheral nervous systems that will adapt/react to diseases or injuries in the brain using biofeedback loops informed by minute variations in natural activities of daily living. These adaptations have signatures unique to each disorder that wearable biosensors, like those embedded in smart clothing, smart watches, or smart shoes can reveal. This TechAdvance project plans to collect real time sensory data from patients as they wear specially designed smart shoes. The massive amounts of data will then be analyzed for each individual person. The goal is to show that there are distinct grouping patterns among those diagnosed with the same disease. The groups that will be tested are neurotypical (control), Autism Spectrum Disorder, Fragile X syndrome, Schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's disease.

(click to enlarge)

A Novel Base Editing Technology for Treatment of Genetic Diseases: Proof-of-Concept in Cystic Fibrosis, Gaucher’s Disease, and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

*Licensed*

Rutgers Inventor(s): Victor Jin; Juan Carlos Collantes
Awarded: August 2018

Summary:

The groundbreaking discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing platform has created hopes and opportunities to develop lifesaving gene editing therapeutics. The system has intrinsic nuclease activity, which triggers sequence specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), leading to activation of cellular pathways such as homology dependent repair (HDR) for gene correction and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) for gene inactivation. It has limitation for therapeutic development for correcting point mutations which are the cause of a majority of human genetic diseases, because: (1) HDR activities in most somatic cells are extremely low; (2) DSBs tend to introduce insertions and deletions that are carcinogenic. Rutgers scientists have developed a new CRISPR gene editing platform, the CRC base editing platform, which allows sequence directed editing (base correction) of a gene or RNA transcript, without introducing DNA DSBs or being dependent on HDR.  This TechAdvance project aims to generate proof-of-concept data for the use of this new platform for therapeutic development. Key to this project are the specific diseases the platform will be tested to treat. The research team hopes to develop constructs that will functionally correct mutations that lead to Cystic Fibrosis, Gaucher's Disease, and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in cultured cell models. If successful, this technology could be developed into cures for these and many more genetic diseases.

(click to enlarge)

Laser Based Radiocarbon Analyzer for Drug Discovery

Rutgers Inventor(s): Daniel Murnick; Mark DeGuzman
Awarded: August 2018

Summary: Radiocarbon analysis is a crucial technology used in the pharmaceutical industry for required tracer studies of drug metabolism.  It is also becoming increasingly useful for real time environmental monitoring.  Existing technologies do not meet the industry’s current needs for high sensitivity, rapid response and ease of use. Our benchtop analyzer uses ultrastable lasers to quantify radiocarbon in samples as small as ten micrograms.  The technology will be adopted by the pharmaceutical industry, including researchers and contract research organizations, as it allows unprecedented sensitivity for small samples, and greatly reduces the amount of radioactivity required for individual studies, allowing earlier and faster evaluation of new drug candidates. Smaller sample size also allows for studies with pediatric and geriatric patients.  Environmental monitors will use the new technology to monitor the amount of fossil fuel based carbon in the atmosphere, an application that may become mandatory with new carbon taxes.

Market Applications:

  • Pharmaceutical Industry: Drug Metabolism organic tracer studies for Pharmacokinetic/ADME/Toxicity in drug development
  • Real-time Environmental Monitoring of atmosphere, oceans, nuclear power plants, fossil fuel vs. biogenic carbon detection
  • Radiocarbon tracing and dating with small samples

(click to enlarge)

Platform Technology for Native Free Radical-Initiated Targeting and Immobilization of Therapeutics

Rutgers Inventor(s): David Shreiber
Awarded: May 2018

Summary:

A platform approach that aims to harness the reactivity of free radicals associated with various pathological states to target and sustain the delivery of therapeutics at the disease site using acrylated PEG. The project will characterize additional biodegradable materials for their capacity in mediating targeted delivery and perform efficacy testing in rodent models

Market Applications:

  • Targeted delivery of bioactive materials such as therapeutics, trophic factors and micronutrients
  • Free radical scavenger – prevention of secondary injury
  • Applicable to a variety of diseases associated with elevated level of free radicals
  • Imaging/detection of early stage diseases

(click to enlarge)

Targeted Delivery of Vitamins to Skin Using Rutgers TyroSpheres

Rutgers Inventor(s): Joachim Kohn ; Bozena Michniak-Kohn
Awarded: April 2018

Summary:

Rutgers has developed a self-assembling polymer that is biodegradable, called TyroSpheres, which can be formulated to enhance the delivery of vitamins and many other cosmeceuticals into the skin as part of a cosmetic product.  As part of a unique collaboration with a personal care company, an important vitamin will be formulated for enhanced skin penetration using the Rutgers TyroSphere technology. The project includes optimization of the formulation and studies with a human cadaver skin model to compare the TyroSpheres formulation with two competitive formulations as controls. Full mass balance and confocal laser scanning microscopy will be used to quantify the delivery of the vitamin to different skin layers.

(click to enlarge)

Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Using Bioactive Cell Growth Capsules

Rutgers Inventor(s): Biju Parekkadan; Aijaz
Awarded: March 2018

Summary:

Dr. Parekkadan designed a bioactive polymer technology that shields cells as they grow within mechanical durable capsules. These capsules can be dissolved after culturing is complete to efficiently recover the cell or biomolecular product. 

Market Applications:

  • Large scale expansion of non-engineered or genetically-engineered cells for clinical cell therapies
  • Production of biotherapeutics from cell lines

(click to enlarge)

Diagnostic Application for Schizophrenia and Mental Disorders

Rutgers Inventor(s): Thomas Papathomas; Attila Farkas
Awarded: February 2018

Summary:

An objective and widely accessible assessment tool to help diagnose or assess treatment successes in real time in schizophrenia patients. Portability of device brings test to patients rather than needing to transport patients to the laboratory. Software/app has been developed to measure the strength of the hollow-mask illusion using a head-mounted stereo display, which is an evidence-based indication of degree of schizophrenia positive psychotic symptoms. Currently developing a version that is based on three-dimensional (3-D) perception derived from motion cues.

Market Applications:

  • Portable device to test influence of stored knowledge in perceiving 3-D faces
  • Tool for diagnosing schizophrenia based on reduced role of stored knowledge in perception
  • Portable large-scale data collection for schizophrenia research
  • Tool to monitor treatment efficiency in schizophrenia

(click to enlarge)

Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Vaccine

Rutgers Inventor(s): Chaoyang Xue; Amariliz Rivera
Awarded: February 2018

Summary:

Dr. Xue's vaccine fills the current drug gap for invasive fungal infections with a novel broad-spectrum human vaccine against disease causing fungal pathogens such as Cryptococcus and Aspergillus species that often causes lung and brain infection in immunocompromised patients, with a high fatality rate.  The therapy will be explored using a proprietary heat-killed mutant fungal strain. 

Market Applications:

  • Vaccine (whole cell, heat-killed)
  • Vaccine adjuvant to prevent and treat fungal infection

Biomimetic, Bioactive Dental Implants

Rutgers Inventor(s): Amir Fakhrzadeh; Rafael Benoliel
Awarded: February 2018

Summary:

This project aims to solve common issues and limitations with titanium dental implants by designing a customizable biomimetic implant. Using a bioactivecomposite material, dental implants are derived from the patient’s own extracted tooth material. 

Market Applications:

  • Transitional dental implants
  • Long term dental implants
  • Dental implants in children and young adult
  • Inexpensive materials and equipment
  • Chair-side fabrication
  • Rapid set time (12 minutes)
  • Compressive strength exceeds masticatory (bite) forces
  • Patient-specific geometry
  • Integration of bioactive composite with jaw

(click to enlarge)

A Novel Composition & Method for Treating Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Rutgers Inventor(s): Gary Aston-Jones ; Hannah Bowrey
Awarded: January 2018

Summary:

Targeting retinal ganglion cells Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) introduces a gene therapy treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. When the DREADDS are activated by generic eye drops, these cells modulate the brain’s natural pathways reducing the symptoms of depression in animal models. This therapy has the potential to treat many neuropsychiatric disorders without systemic exposure to neuropsychiatric drugs with high side-effects. | Pharmaceutical gene therapy – neuropsychiatric disorders

Market Applications:

  • Agents and method for therapeutic treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression and circadian disorders.
  • A kit for therapeutic treatment of depression.

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

Clinical Validation of FISH Assay for Early Detection of Esophageal Cancer

Rutgers Inventor(s): Manisha Bajpai; Kiron M. Das; Hana Aviv
Awarded: December 2017

Summary:

Objective minimally invasive (small biopsy sample) diagnostic of the risk of forming esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA cancer) in patients with Barrett’s epithelium (BE). Specific cancer causing chromosomal abnormalities are identified using specially design chromosomal regional probes (FISH probe).

Market Applications:

  • Objective test for cancer risk in BE patients
  • Can be combined with traditional pathology procedures
  • Early detection of cancer, allowing early intervention and expanding treatment options
  • Stratification of high-risk BE patients and early detection of esophageal adenocarcinoma

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

New Antibiotics: Efficient Microbial Extract Screening and Mutational De-Replication

Rutgers Inventor(s): Richard H. Ebright; Stefano Donadio
Awarded: December, 2017

Summary: 

This new platform technology overcomes two obstacles to discovering and prioritizing new antibacterial compounds by use of microbial-extract screening: (1) microbial extracts can contain previously known antibacterial compounds (resulting in effort wasted on re-isolation of previously known antibacterial compounds), and (2) microbial extracts can contain antibacterial compounds at concentrations that differ by multiple orders of magnitude (invalidating use of rankings of antibacterial activities of extracts to infer antibacterial activities of antibacterial compounds therein).

Market Applications: 

  • New antibacterial drug discovery platform.
  • Pipeline of new antibacterial lead compounds

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

Novel Biosensors for Rapid Determination of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

Rutgers Inventor(s): Yicheng Lu; Pavel Ivanoff Reyes; Steven Zheng; Keyang Yang; Andrew Zheng
Awarded: July 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on the development of a highly sensitive, dynamic, rapid, compact and low cost diagnostic sensor technology for monitoring antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and screening antimicrobials that work against resistant strains. This technology is well-suited for AMR detection and has shown the ability to detect the bactericidal effect of ampicillin in E. coli within 10 minutes. In addition, it is also able to detect the growth inhibition effect of miconazole and cytotoxic effect of amphotericin B in yeast within 20-40 minutes.

Market Applications:

  • AMR diagnostic tool/point-of-care diagnostics devices
  • Research assays
  • Drug discovery - high throughput screening of antibiotics, antifungal and anticancer agents

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

First-in-Class Pan-TAM Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

*Licensed*

Rutgers Inventor(s): William J. Welsh; Raymond Birge; Youyi Peng; Vladyslav Kholodovych; Stanley Kimani; Thomas W. Comollo
Awarded: June 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on a novel family of small molecule inhibitors that uniquely block TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk) activation by the endogenous ligand Gas6 in the extracellular domain. In vitro and in vivo tests have demonstrated good anti-cancer activities without discernible toxicity to normal cells/tissues.

Market Applications:

  • Anti-cancer therapeutic
  • Combined with other therapies such as PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors
  • Treatment of infectious diseases

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

A New Catalyst for Generation of Carbon Feedstocks & Fuels from Carbon Dioxide

Rutgers Inventor(s): G. Charles Dismukes; Martha Greenblatt; Anders Laursen; Karin Calvinho
Awarded: June 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on transition metal phosphide catalysts used to selectively generate valuable hydrocarbons for fuel or chemical feedstocks for production from CO2. Using renewable electricity for power, the process can be fully sustainable and a carbon neutral technology.

Market Applications:

  • Renewable feedstocks and fuels
  • Methane and ethylene production for the chemical industry
  • CO2 gas to solids via polymeric [CH2O]n (3>n>100), CO2 emissions recycling/mitigation, electrical energy storage;

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

Tracking the Spread of Cancer with Light for Targeted Treatment

Rutgers Inventor(s): Prabhas Moghe; Richard Riman; Mei-Chee Tan; Dominik Naczynski
Awarded: June 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on a new rare earth (RE)-based light-emitting, multifunctional composites for use in a wide variety of biomedical applications including the identification and tracking of cancer. They found that the properties of the composites, in particular their aqueous stability, solubility, biocompatibility, and functionality, can be tailored for specific applications by coating RE nanoparticles with suitable polypeptides, polysaccharides or polymers.

Market Applicaitons:

  • Non-invasive imaging (2 and 3-dimensional)
  • Image-guided interventions (surgical and non-surgical)
  • Drug tracking and delivery
  • Photodynamic therapy

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

Using Virtual Reality to Help Persons Walk Post Stroke

Rutgers Inventor(s): Judy Deutsch; Robb Gosine
Awarded: May 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on a low cost and scalable solution for bringing virtual reality rehabilitation into clinics and patients' homes.

Market Applications:

  • Games were developed to be used at home by patients needing physical therapy
  • First in person with therapist, then can be moved entirely virtual
  • Data collected from the game can be shared with physicians and other therapists
  • Expectation is device and virtual sessions with a therapist will be covered or reimbursed by health insurance

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

High Performance Graphene-Polymer Matrix Composites

*Licensed*

Rutgers Inventor(s): Jennifer Lynch; Tom Nosker; Bernie Kear
Awarded: April 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on a scalable method to exfoliate graphite into graphene directly within a molten polymer. The discovery creates the opportunity for the development of lightweight, high performance, next generation materials of extraordinary strength and impact resistance.

Market Applications:

  • Military (lightweight armor, vehicles, small boats, helmets, munitions)
  • Aerospace (UAVs)
  • Transportation (vehicles, small boats)
  • Infrastructure (bridges)
  • Sporting Goods (tennis, golf, hockey, skiing)
  • Packaging (barrier resistant layer)
  • Feedstock for polymer industry

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)

 

TechXpress

Sigma-1 Receptor (S1R) Antagonists as Alternatives to Opioid Narcotics for Treatment of Pain

Rutgers Inventor(s): William J. Welsh; Youyi Peng
Awarded: April 2018

Summary:

New discoveries have associated the Sigma-1 Receptor (S1R) in neurons with pain and a possible target for pain management. The June 2016 publication of the X-ray crystal-based 3D structure for the human S1R-antagonist structure, has allowed the computational design of novel S1R molecules with potential clinical use by this Rutgers team. A limited number of compounds have been designed and tested with promising potency, safety and other features. The project will fund the design and synthesis of more novel compounds and conduct in vitro S1R binding assay and potency determination. The top performing compounds will be combined with commonly used opioids in vivo to explore whether these compounds potentiates the opioids and/or mitigate sides effects.

(click to enlarge)

Vector Development for Stem Cell Transfection

Rutgers Inventor(s): Arash Hatefi
Awarded: February 2018

Summary:

Dr. Hatefi developed a novel, safe, and highly efficient human stem cell transfection system (including novel vectors, buffer and other components). Key to the vectors properties is its ability to target the VEGFR-1 cell surface receptor which is expressed on adipose-derived stem cells and is predicted to be expressed other stem cell types of therapeutic interest. The project aims to confirm that the novel transfection system works for both bone marrow derived and neural stem cells

Market Applications:

  • Transfection reagent for stem cells for clinical and research applications

(click to enlarge)

In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific Memory T-cells

Rutgers Inventor(s): Fumio Matsumura
Awarded: January 2018

Summary:

Dr. Matsumura developed a novel method to generate antigen-specific memory T-cells in vitro with mouse dendritic cells that can target cancer cells expressing specific antigens. Key to this method is the optimization of the cell culture environment and process to maximize T-cell differentiation into memory T-cells and be harvested at a therapeutically significant quantity. The project will attempt to adopt the team’s current methodology into humans and generate human memory T-cells in vitro.

Scale-up and Mechanical Testing of Polymers made from Silica

Rutgers Inventor(s): Masanori Hara
Awarded: January 2018

Summary:

The technology is a family of polymers with inorganic backbones (Si-O and P-O) and ionic crosslinks (inorganic ionomers) that can be produced from minerals that are abundant in the earth’s crust. The strong inorganic backbone lead to high chemical and thermal stability, reducing the number of toxic byproducts. The ionic crosslinks are reversible, contributing to self-healing properties of the polymers. These inorganic ionomers may vary from soft rubbery materials, plastic like consistency, to hard resins, giving them a wide range of applications. Manufacture around 100 grams of the sample material, compare the material’s mechanical properties (impact strengths and tensile/compressive properties) to commercially relevant materials made of PS/PMMA

Market Applications:

  • Biocompatible food packaging
  • Flexible displays
  • Fuel cell membranes
  • Adhesives
  • Catalysts
  • Composites
  • Automotive

(click to enlarge)

Treatment of Fibrotic Diseases Using Agents that Disrupt the Structure of Collagen

Rutgers Inventor(s): Edward Yurkow
Awarded: November 2017

Summary:

Dr. Yurkow is exploring the use of a commonly available agent to reverse progression of diseases associated with collagen fibrosis such as Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis(IPF) and liver cirrhosis. The target agent’s mechanism of action leads to a disruption of fibrous collagen to form secondary and tertiary structures.

Synthetic Antibody Production for Immunotherapies

Rutgers Inventor(s): William Belden
Awarded: October 2017

Summary:

A novel method to generate complex antibody phage display libraries. This method utilizes a recombination-based cloning method with a set of proprietary DNA plasmids, which allow for the recombination of any antibody light chain with any antibody heavy chain even across different species. The method also prevents the common toxic effects of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) to the yeast cells during the cloning process.  Use this method to construct a novel scFv library against triple-negative breast cancer cells consisting of 107-109 unique clones. Then screen the library to identify high-affinity scFv for the cancer cells.

3-D Pre-Vascularized Scaffold for Bone Regeneration

Rutgers Inventor(s): Joseph Freeman; Pankaj Pushpendra Patel
Awarded: June 2017

Summary:

This project focuses on a novel bone graft which combines bone-like architecture, ceramic support structures, pre-vascularized tubes, and patient-derived stem cells to create a graft that can immediately support patient weight upon implantation and simultaneously develop new bone and integrated vasculature for short-term and long-term viability and mechanics.

Market Applications:

  • Treatment for bone disorder, loss, and skeletal deficiencies arising from traumatic injury, abnormal development, cancer, and degenerative bone diseases
  • The bone grafting market in the U.S. has an estimated value over $1 billion, making bone second to blood as the most frequently transplanted material
  • Currently no load-bearing, synthetic bone grafts on the market

Download: PDF icon Technology Details (pdf)

(click to enlarge)